ONLY WHEN WE UNDERSTAND CAN WE CARE. ONLY WHEN WE CARE WILL WE HELP. WITHOUT OUR HELP THE KIWI IS LOST.

Predator Control

New Zealand has been geographically separated from other land masses for over 80 million years and, with the absence of land mammals, our native wildlife has evolved in isolation.

When Europeans arrived they introduced animals which later became pests and predators. These  took a serious toll on the native plants, birds, reptiles and invertebrates, who were ill-equipped to deal with such a threat.


9 out of every 10 kiwi chicks born in the wild will die before they reach breeding age without predator control.

Predator Free 2050 will deliver huge benefits across New Zealand.
Eradicating rats, stoats and possums will be beneficial to our environment. These three predators alone kill about 25 million native birds every year.

 
Predator Control is effective:

For the first time in more than a century South Island robin/ kakaruai have produced chicks on Bluff Hill. This is a result of nine years of predator control by the Bluff Hill Motupōhue Environment Trust.

The numbers of the tiny alpine rock wren/tuke has increased in the Kahurangi National Park.


Up to 70% of kiwi chicks survive to breeding age in areas that have predator control.

Intensified stoat trapping in the Murchison Mountains has relulted in no recorded predation of takahē following the 2016 mast year.

What is a beech mast?

Two thirds of our forests have some beech in them and about half of these have nothing but beech trees. When the beech trees flower they produce large amounts of seed (masts). Masts are triggered by a summer that is warmer than the previous one.

Beech seed provides good food for rats, mice which in turn are good food for stoats. During mast years these species will breed prolifically with the abundance of food.

The increased number of rats and stoats prey on native birds  such as mohua, kākā, kea, whio and kiwi as well as other species at risk like bats and land snails.


 
New Zealand Conservation Trust's Predator Control Project

The Trust has an extensive trapping programme consisting of 400 DOC200 double traps placed in the Craigieburn Forest Park, Castle Hill, Broken River and Bealey Spur.

As at 2014 there have been over 1000 predators caught in these traps, the majority of those being stoats.
These traps are instrumental in protecting native wildlife from predators such as stoats, ferrets, weasels, rats and hedgehogs.

In 2017 a trap line was placed in the Carlyle Valley. This trap line consists of 70 DOC200 traps.
In March 2017 the Trust requested that Wildland Consultants Ltd conduct a   bird and bat survey in the Carlyle Valley, Lewis Pass region. Twelve indigenous and five exotic bird species were observed. At the time of conducting the survey no long-tailed bats were recorded.

In 2018 two Trail cameras were positioned in the valley to help us detect what predators are roaming in the areas where we have traps. Identifying the pests means we can ensure we are placing the correct bait to target these species as well as making certain the traps are positioned in the correct place.

 
Members of the Trust as well as a number of dedicated volunteers  give up their free time to check, clear and reset the traps.

If you are interested in making a difference to our environment and would enjoy the comradeship of a group of people who are passionate about ensuring New Zealand's native species are protected. CONTACT US.

Or find out where the closest trapping programme is to you, click HERE





kiwi kreche-85
 
 
Craigieburn












DOC 200 double trap













    ferret Craigieburn  

 Will with traps
Justin and traps 1
 























 
   
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LOCATION
60 Hussey Road
Northwood
Christchurch
8051
New Zealand


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CONTACT US
+64 3 359 6226 ext 704
conservationtrust@willowbank.co.nz




Charities Registration Number: 21020