ONLY WHEN WE UNDERSTAND CAN WE CARE. ONLY WHEN WE CARE WILL WE HELP. WITHOUT OUR HELP THE KIWI IS LOST.

The Story of Mohua

Mohua the Great Spotted Kiwi's road to recovery
  • In 2004 Mohua was captured to be translocated to another regionMohua the great spotted kiwi
  • During this process the tip of her bill was accidently broken with her left nostril being removed and only a portion of her right nostril remaining.
  • Mohua had to be assist-fed as it was too painful for her to probe in the soil and feed herself.
  • After a few months recovering she was trialled in a controlled wild setting, but she was not able to maintain her body weight.
  • She was sent to Mt Bruce National Wildlife Centre for continued rehabilition.
  • After another failed attempt to put Mohua back into a controlled wild setting she was sent to Massey University.
  • In 2005 Mohua was brought to the Trust's breeding facility to continue with her rehabilitation.
  • Not long after she arrived an exciting development happened. Her top mandible started growing a protective case for her nostril. This was wonderful news as staff were still having to assist-feed her. Perhaps Mohua would begin to feed herself.
  • Staff were extremely hopeful watching Mohua begin to slowly feed herself, consuming 10 grams of mince on her own for the first time.
  • In 2006, over two years since the injury occurred, Mohua hit a milestone that no one ever thought would happen. She showed the first true signs of probing in the soil and maintaining her weight.
  • In addition to this exciting news, a mate was found for Mohua. Saxon arrived from the Otorohanga kiwi House in the hope that they might breed. Unfortunately this did not eventuate.
  • Mohua's appetite for worms increased to such a degree that she was consuming 500 earthworms a day! This meant every staff member was constantly digging up patches of soil looking for worms to feed her. Articles were placed in newspapers requesting help from the public. This continued for some time until we were able to convince her that the diet fed to the other kiwi on site was just as tasty as earthworms.
  • Mohua did encounter a few more setbacks but, nine years on, we can definitely say that Mohua, the fiesty Great Spotted Kiwi, is able to feed herself.
  • Due to the nature of the injury sustained, constant trimming and filing of her bill needs to be done to ensure the casing doesn't close over the nostrils.
  • Mohua resides in a large predator-free area adjacent to the Kiwi Breeding Centre.

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WHAT WE DO
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LOCATION
60 Hussey Road
Northwood
Christchurch
8051
New Zealand


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+64 3 359 6226 ext 704
conservationtrust@willowbank.co.nz




Charities Registration Number: 21020